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“Norfolk Broads General Boating, Cruising and Mooring Tips”

Norfolk Broads Handbook

If you intend crossing Breydon Water or visiting Great Yarmouth you may wish to select the “Crossing Breydon Water” tab above. You can also print this information as a PDF.


Tide Table Link

By Norfolk Broads.Org

An excellent site that includes a tide table relevant to your holiday dates. Enter your holiday start date, and number of days then click on calculate.

Youtube Video Link

A minor collision and another of 2 boats going through Wroxham bridge.  One gets it right but the other does not.

Bow Thruster Choosing a Boat General Cruising Bridges Mooring Up Leave Moorings Onboard

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Leaving Moorings

In strong currents /winds you will need to react a lot quicker, especially if moored between other boats.  It is not often that currents are that strong but between Reedham and Yarmouth and on to Acle are about the strongest. If you arrive or depart moorings approx 1 hour after high or low water the current tends to be more slack.


Start engine and if you have one ensure bow thruster is on.  Untie the stern/back rope. A crew member to untie bow/front rope holding the rope toward stern/back of boat to stop it hitting the boat in front and walk a few paces towards the stern/back to give more clearance.  The stern/back should go out.  After the boat is well out almost pointing to the far bank, the crew member should board the boat with the rope.  Pilot/driver should reverse until well clear.  If you have one bow thruster may be used to assist. Navigate to chosen direction.


 





In strong currents /winds you will need to react a lot quicker, especially if moored between other boats.  It is not often that currents are that strong but between Reedham and Yarmouth and on to Acle are about the strongest. If you arrive or depart moorings approx 1 hour after high or low water the current tends to be more slack.


Start engine and if you have one ensure bow thruster is on. If you do have a bow thruster Ensure the helm/Steering wheel is set in the centre position first! undo the bow/front rope and stow onboard then a crew member undo the stern/rear rope, loop it around the post and climb aboard. Once the bow thruster has pushed the bow out so as to clear any craft moored close by, flip the rope off the stern post and pull on board. Put throttle into slow forward position and leave slowly until well clear of all nearby craft.









The Pilot/driver to turn the wheel full lock toward the bank, gently throttle forward into the bank.  Ensure that the fenders or rubber protection are preventing the boats hull from being scuffed.  The stern/back should go out. After the boat is well out almost pointing to the far bank, the crew member should board the boat with the rope. Pilot/driver should reverse until well clear.










Start engine and if you have one check the bow thruster is on. Pull up and stow the mud weight. Remove both stern/back ropes, board boat. Put in forward gear and gently pull away.


If the mud weight is stuck. I place the rope over my shoulder, keeping my back straight bend my knees slightly (only enough to give a lift of a few inches) take up the slack pulling the rope taught on my shoulder. I then stand up using my legs and shoulder to lift the mud weight free from the suction of the mud.

If you try this method extreme care is needed.  Don’t risk putting your back out or being pulled overboard.


I have never had to do this but If the mud weight is still too difficult to lift, I would take up the slack in the mud weight rope, pull it as tight as possible and secure it to the cleat. Ensure there is sufficient room behind and move the boat a little slowly astern. This should free the weight from the suction of the mud. If it is not possible to go astern I would do the same with the rope but go gently forward until the mud weight is free. I would then leave the engine running but ensure that neutral is selected. If necessary I would retie the stern ropes before lifting and stowing the mud weight.  We are now ready to untie and depart the mooring.

  

I have not tried this but if the boat is equipped with a bow thruster I think it may be possible to use this to move the boat enough to free the mud weight.  I would have the engine running but keep in neutral.

I would only try this method if  there is reasonable gap to both sides of the boat.  There needs to be enough room to the side and direction that you intend to nudge the boat and a reasonable distance between any boat that may be moored to the opposite side. If not the force of the bow thruster could push one boat into another or possibly the river bank.


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Boating on the Norfolk Broads


Start engine and if you have one ensure bow thruster is on.  Untie the bow/front rope. A crew member to untie stern/back rope holding the rope toward bow/front of boat to stop it hitting the boat behind and walk a few paces towards the bow/front to give more clearance.  The bow/front should go out.  After the boat is well out almost pointing to the far bank, the crew member should board the boat with the rope.  Pilot/driver should pull away